“Beneath the Citadel” by Destiny Soria

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This book is INCREDIBLE. The world-building is masterful — it grabs you from page one. Follow this motley crew as they use their strengths to overcome the strange corruption happening in the Citadel. There’s magic! Psychic powers! Prison breaks! Snarky attitudes! Ever-shifting suspected sources of evil! Treason! Transformations! Diversity! And so much more! Pick it up today — I guarantee you won’t regret it!

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 (if there were more stars, I’d give them!)

Buy your copy here!

 

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Links in post are affiliate links whose proceeds go toward the maintenance of this blog.

“And the Trees Crept In” by Dawn Kurtagich

★★★★☆ New release Tuesday!

28449150Disclaimer: This is a HORROR book. I typically don’t watch horror movies or read horror books because I get too scared, so I’m not sure what prompted me to request this from the publisher.

That being said: And the Trees Crept In is extremely creepy and unsettling. When Silla and Nori escape their abusive father, the only place they’d think of going is their Aunt Cath’s house, a large estate called La Baume. The house is old, run-down, and creaky, but it’s all they have. Aunt Cath is so sweet to the girls, nurturing them and loving them like they’ve never experienced. But one day, Cath loses it when Nori gets too close to the surrounding woods. She won’t stop pacing the floor in the attic and keeps talking about someone named “The Creeper Man”. And then one day, Silla notices the trees. They’re creeping closer, day by horror-filled day.

If that doesn’t creep you out right there, I don’t know what will. This is an absolute mind-f*** of a book (pardon the language), written in such a way that it makes the reader feel like they are losing their mind right along with Silla. I had to only read this in the daylight, when others were around me, and it still had my heart thumping and my eyes darting to the dark corners of my house.

And the Trees Crept In was a very intense read and perplexing story, but definitely don’t read it if you’re faint of heart like me. That’s a compliment, by the way — it was perfectly creepy, unsettling, poop-your-pants and run to your mom scary.

Purchase the book here.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

“Serafina and the Black Cloak” by Robert Beatty

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Serafina and her father live in the basement of the estate Pa works for, unbeknownst to the homeowners. Serafina has led a life of secrecy, hiding from people and ridding the Biltmore estate of its rat infestation. One night, while catching some pests, Serafina sees a girl get attacked by a man in a swirling black cloak. Narrowly escaping capture herself, Serafina is determined to find out who the black cloak is and how to stop him from stealing more children.

This book was 100% not what I thought it was going to be from the cover and things I’ve seen around the internet (but clearly I wasn’t paying close enough attention). That being said — it is a really fun story with mystery, edge-of-your-seat thrills, young love, and the family dynamics of these strange squatters. I really enjoyed the pace, and I did not successfully guess who the cloak was nor any of the twists! An easy read, Serafina and the Black Cloak is good for middle-grade and high-school readers, as well as any other YA lover.

Purchase the book here.

“The Graces” by Laure Eve

thegraces★★★★☆ Out on Tuesday (9/6)! There are two gorgeous covers for this book, so I’m including both in this post! The red cover is the US cover and the purple cover is in the UK!

“Everyone said they were witches. I desperately wanted to believe it. I’d only been at this school a couple of months, but I saw how it was. They moved through the corridors like sleek fish, ripples in their wake, stares following their backs and their hair.”

cg1litjxeaitrihRiver recently moved to a new city and a new school, and just like the rest of the town, she quickly becomes obsessed with the Grace family. They’re rumored to be powerful witches and to gain their friendship is rumored to be near impossible.

But River becomes friends with Summer Grace, and she has a huge crush on her older brother, Fenrin (along with every other girl on the planet). She quickly becomes a feature in their house, hanging out with Summer, Fenrin, and Thalia, and their close family friend Wolf. They do different spells and incantations together and call themselves witches. But then something goes extremely wrong. And no one remembers what happened.

This is the story of magic (or not?), friendship, popularity, mystery, and danger. Some reviewers are comparing this to Twilight, but I would argue that that is just the first few chapters that you could draw serious comparisons. I think this is a great story, compelling and fascinating. It definitely put a spell on me.

Purchase the book here. (Out 9/6/16)

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

“Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

★★★★☆

stationelevenhcus2Station Eleven is the story of the post-apocalyptic world after the “Georgia Flu” wipes out a massive amount of people. The story flashes back and forth from before the flu, to years after the flu devastated the world. There are also many different storylines woven through the book, which I absolutely love–seeing how the characters are all related or came together eventually.

Another thing that I was really excited about in Station Eleven is that most of the post-apocalyptic world stuff happens in Michigan, which is one of my favorite places. It was easy to relate to the places, the weather and the general atmosphere being described because I’ve been there.

The audiobook was especially awesome, the narrator was engaging and easy to listen to. I really did not enjoy parts of this book, but others I absolutely adored. No wonder this book is so popular. I just wish I had picked it up earlier! So here’s my recommendation for you: Pick this one up–before the world ends!

Purchase the book here.

August Wrap-Up!

So last month, I thought I’d outdone myself by reading 20 books. In August, I read 22 books!

That’s 1 book for every 1.4 days. I’m currently standing at 113 books read in 2016. (That’s a full 33 books over my goal!)

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  1. Labyrinth Lost  by Zoraida Córdova
  2. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien
  3. Nevernight by Jay Kristoff (Review)
  4. The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko by Scott Stambach (Review)
  5. 100 Days by Nicole McInnes (Review)*
  6. The Memory of Things by Gae Polisner (Review)*
  7. The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer*
  8. The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien
  9. The Assassin Game by Kirsty McKay*
  10. The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee (Review)
  11. A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir (Review)
  12. The Tender Bar by J.R. Moehringer*
  13. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris
  14. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  15. The Graces by Laure Eve* (Review)
  16. Serafina and the Black Cloak by Robert Beatty*
  17. And the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich*
  18. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie*
  19. The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin*
  20. Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow (Review)
  21. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel* (Review)

*Audiobook or eARC, not pictured
(Plus 1 book proofread for my work, not pictured and not within my blog’s scope of genre)

Some of these books have yet to be reviewed on my blog, but I will add the links as I add the reviews! September is going to rock! So many good books are coming out!

Have you read any of these books? Which ones are you looking forward to reading?

“Girl in Pieces” by Kathleen Glasgow

★★★★☆ New release Tuesday!

24879132Girl in Pieces is arguably one of the most important books I’ve read this year. It explores the issue of self-harm (cutting in particular) and depression.

Charlie Davis wakes up in a rehab center. Last thing she remembers is in the Seed House, Frank trying to get her to give herself to strange men in exchange for a place to stay. Then she’s cutting herself, deeper than normal, trying to end it all. But she didn’t succeed, and now she has to put her life (what little she had) back together.

This book was profoundly sad and heartbreaking, but hopeful too. As a 25-year-old, I’m not too old to remember what Charlie was going through. I remember how vividly awful life could seem at moments, how unsure and insecure I was about myself. I never self-harmed or cut, but I can relate to the thoughts Charlie had. Sometimes life is really tough, especially when you’re young and it seems like the end of the world every time something goes wrong.

Girl in Pieces has a great message for anyone who feels that way. Just keep trying, keep doing better, and reach out for help if you need it. There’s always a reason to live and you should never give up.

Purchase the book here.

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.